HEALTH AND CLIMATE CHANGE
Taking care of humankind at +2°C

HEALTH AND CLIMATE CHANGE
Taking care of humankind at +2°C

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Climate change tipping point could be coming sooner than we think

Source(s): colombia university

New study shows that vegetation may not be able to continue abating the effects of emissions from human activities

By Holly Evarts

Global carbon emissions reached a record high in 2018, rising by an estimated 3.4 percent in the U.S. alone. This trend is making scientists, government officials, and industry leaders more anxious than ever about the future of our planet. As United Nations Secretary General António Guterres said at the opening of the 24th annual U.N. climate conference on December 3, “We are in deep trouble with climate change.”

Columbia Engineering study, published today in Natureconfirms the urgency to tackle climate change. While it’s known that extreme weather events can affect the year-to-year variability in carbon uptake, and some researchers have suggested that there may be longer-term effects, this new study is the first to actually quantify the effects through the 21st century and demonstrates that wetter-than-normal years do not compensate for losses in carbon uptake during dryer-than-normal years, caused by events such as droughts or heat waves.

This news is related to one of the 12 themes of the global conference on health and climate change of the international movement of the Red Cross and Red Crescent.

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